Zuckerberg says Facebook’s failure to remove militia page ‘an operational mistake’ By Reuters


© Reuters. Facebook Chairman and CEO Zuckerberg testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington

(Reuters) – Facebook (NASDAQ:) Inc Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg took responsibility and faulted his company for not removing the page and event for a militia group before two people were killed at a protest in Kenosha, saying it was “largely an operational mistake”.

The page and event listing violated Facebook’s policies and should have been removed after numerous complaints were received about the group’s violent nature, Zuckerberg said in a video to employees that he posted publicly on his Facebook profile.

The social media company removed the page for ‘Kenosha Guard’, and an event listing for ‘Armed Citizens to Protect Our Lives and Property’ a day after the shooting on Tuesday.

Two people were killed during protests in Kenosha that broke out in response to the police shooting of a Black man earlier this week.

“The contractors and reviewers who the initial complaints were funneled to basically didn’t pick this up,” Zuckerberg said. “And on second review, doing it more sensitively, the team that’s responsible for dangerous organizations recognized that this violated the policies and we took it down.”

Zuckerberg said there was no evidence the person charged with the shooting followed the Kenosha Guard page, but added that the company will continue to evolve its policies for identifying potentially dangerous organizations.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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Facebook, Twitter remove Trump posts for making ‘false claims’ about coronavirus


President Donald Trump answers a question during a press conference in the White House on Wednesday.


AFP/Getty Images

Facebook Inc. and Twitter Inc. on Wednesday removed posts by President Donald Trump that violated their coronavirus misinformation policies.

The identical posts were a video clip from a Fox News interview with Trump about reopening schools, in which he wrongly claimed children are “virtually immune” to COVID-19.

While children appear to be generally less affected by the coronavirus, they are not “virtually immune,” and a number have died. The state of California, for example, has recorded more than 48,000 cases of COVID-19 in patients 17 and younger.

A Facebook
FB,
-0.28%

spokesperson said in an email: “This video includes false claims that a group of people is immune from COVID-19 which is a violation of our policies around harmful COVID misinformation.” 

However, that message was not included on Facebook’s site. The post was replaced by a message reading “This content isn’t available right now,” which does not explain why it was removed or that its content was inaccurate.

It was the first time Facebook has taken down a Trump post for violating its coronavirus rules. In June, Facebook took down Trump campaign ads that included a Nazi symbol, and in March took down Trump campaign ads that were misleading about the census.

Trump’s official campaign account — which Trump retweeted — posted the same video on Twitter, which has been more active than Facebook at taking down presidential posts that violate guidelines. It was up for at least five hours before being taken down, with a note reading: “This Tweet violated the Twitter Rules.”

A Twitter
TWTR,
+1.21%

spokesperson confirmed the tweet was removed for being in violation of the company’s rules on COVID-19 misinformation. Twitter added that the Trump campaign’s official account will be blocked from posting again until the video is removed.

Trump has harshly criticized social-media companies for fact-checking and removing his posts, and in July the Trump administration asked the FCC to reinterpret a 1996 law that gives broad latitude to how tech companies police content on their sites.





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U.S. appeals court rejects GM’s call to remove judge from Fiat Chrysler lawsuit By Reuters


© Reuters. The GM logo is seen at the General Motors Assembly Plant in Ramos Arizpe

(Reuters) – A U.S. appeals court on Monday denied General Motors Co’s (N:) petition to remove a lower court judge from its racketeering lawsuit against Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) (MI:), but said the companies’ heads need not meet to settle the issue.

The Sixth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said U.S. District Judge Paul Borman abused his discretion by requiring GM CEO Mary Barra and FCA’s head, Mike Manley, to meet face-to-face for reasons unrelated to the case, and without taking into account the risks of travel during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The district judge’s order for the parties to report back to the court in only eight days was also unwarranted, the appeals court said. Borman in June ordered Barra and Manley to meet by July 1, and later amended his order to allow other officials in their place.

“We do not mean to say, however, that the district judge may not order a pretrial settlement conference and/or mediation in the normal course,” the appeals court said in a filing.

The court in June stayed Borman’s order requiring officials from the two firms to resolve the lawsuit, and on Monday rejected GM’s request for a new judge to oversee the case, saying Borman’s desire for a quick settlement was “not so extreme” that he needed to be replaced.

GM said in a statement it was grateful that the court had quickly reviewed and granted its petition for a writ of mandamus. However, the company did not comment on the rejection of its request to reassign the case to another judge.

GM sued FCA last year, accusing the Italian-American company’s executives of bribing United Auto Workers union officials to secure labor agreements that put GM at a disadvantage.

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.





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After two months, regulators remove short-selling bans


European stock-market regulators have shelved their short-selling bans after two months, citing the less-turbulent conditions.

The Austrian, Belgian, Greek, French, Italian and Spanish securities regulators have jointly decided to end their short-selling bans that had been in place since the middle of March. Other countries including Germany and the U.K. didn’t impose bans.

France’s stock-market regulator, the Autorité des Marchés Financiers, and Italy’s Commissione Nazionale per le Società e la Borsa said they had viewed “progressive normalization” in markets.

“Markets have partly reduced their losses, trading volumes and volatility have returned to levels that are still high compared to mid-February, however this reflects market participants’ uncertainties in the current context,” said the statement from the AMF. The regulators said they would stay in close contact with one another.

Last week a number of trade groups had protested the bans.

“Market data on securities subject to the restrictions in place in Austria, Belgium, France, Greece, Italy and Spain are available and show that those securities are not collectively performing better than those in comparable jurisdictions that are not subject to restrictions; shares are more volatile than they were prior to the bans; and markets exhibit wider spreads since restrictions were put in place,” said the letter from the Alternative Investment Management Association, Managed Funds Association, FIA European Principal Traders Association and World Federation of Exchanges.

Volume traded in restricted shares made up 30% of the total volume traded in Europe. After the bans, this value dropped to 23%, the trade groups said.

Strategists at Barclays said the move to lift the ban shouldn’t reintroduce volatility. They looked at the short-selling bans during the global financial crisis and found that European stocks rallied after their removal. “It thus seems that as long as fundamentals improve, short selling should not be an impediment to further recovery in equity markets,” the strategists said.

The Stoxx Europe 600
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+1.98%

rallied on Monday, with similarly strong gains both for markets that removed the bans, such as the France CAC 40
PX1,
+2.27%
,
and ones that never imposed them, such as the German DAX
DAX,
+2.78%



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‘All they care about is making money.’ Can my supermarket manager force me to remove my face mask at work?


Dear Moneyist,

I am in my 60s and I work for a well-known supermarket chain in North Carolina. My job requires me to be in the aisles at all time, answering customers’ questions and stocking shelves.

I decided to wear a face mask because I am unable to remain six feet away from other customers, as per the guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. My manager told me to take it off. He said the company was following the CDC guidelines, which stated that masks do not have any affect in protecting us against the coronavirus. He will not allow me to wear it.

He also told me that, if I felt uncomfortable working, I could go home. Of course, he would not pay me if I went home, so that’s easy for him to say. He said it was not his decision, and said he was just following the company’s orders. However, he did say that if a doctor provided me with a note, stating that I needed to wear a mask, I would be allowed to wear the mask while I was working.

Dispatches from the front lines of a pandemic: ‘They’ve likened it to a war where the number of casualties just keep on coming’: Italians find solidarity, resilience and music during the coronavirus lockdown

Since when do people in authority have the right to keep you from using any means possible of protecting yourself so that you feel comfortable in the workplace? It’s like all they care about is making money. Its already hectic enough with all the extra pressure from the people coming in, and being outraged at times because we are out of basic necessities like hand sanitizer and toilet roll.

When he told me to take it off, it felt like he was pouring salt into a wound. During times like these, don’t you think it would be nice for people to show some appreciation? Wearing the mask makes me feel safer and helps to guard me against coronavirus. It does not interfere with my ability to do my job I wonder if other companies in the retail industry are treating their employees in this fashion, too?

Thank you for your time, and for listening. My God bless the world during these trying times.

Just trying to stay safe

Dear Trying,

Amen to that.

Faith is important at a time like this. There is so much about this disease that we do not know. We may need more than God to get us through this. We, after all, have free will and, whatever your religious or spiritual beliefs, we make our own decisions. We will have to act as a team, stay home as much as possible, and practice social distancing to help stop the spread of COVID-19.

There are arguments for and against masks. There are some who argue that telling people not to wear them, while medical personnel do, will only serve to confuse people; they say it will stigmatize those who simply prefer to wear them and/or have a preexisting condition. They also point out that masks send a warning to those who may not be taking this virus seriously enough.

Face masks help prevent patients from spreading the virus, but they don’t protect the healthy, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. They can help act as a barrier if a sick person coughs or sneezes. “Most face masks do not effectively filter small particles from the air and don’t prevent leakage around the edge of the mask when the user inhales,” the CDC adds.

They are, however, needed for health-care professionals. N95 masks are tighter-fitting than surgical masks and protect against small particles and large droplets, according to the CDC. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said that there are only 30 million N95 masks in the national stockpile, and “as many as 300 million masks are needed in the U.S. for health-care workers.”

If you are healthy, you only need to wear a mask if you are taking care of a person with suspected COVID-19 infection, according to the World Health Organization. “Wear a mask if you are coughing or sneezing. Masks are effective only when used in combination with frequent hand-cleaning with alcohol-based hand rub or soap and water,” the organization adds.

Dispatches from the front lines of a pandemic: ‘The sunbathers all seemed to be talking about coronavirus’: Australians brace for the end of summer — and the start of flu season

As to your question, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration states that such decisions “must be based upon a hazard analysis of the workers’ specific work environments and the different protective properties of each type of personal protective equipment.” They are not designed or certified “to prevent the inhalation of small airborne contaminants,” it adds.

The face mask may help you feel safer, but you already know that there is no medical safety standard that says people who are not sick should wear masks. It may also send the wrong message to customers and encourage them to believe that they should be wearing one too when, in fact, hospitals around the country are facing a shortage of face masks, respirators, and other equipment.

But you’re right. It’s a trying time. People are stressed out and scared. The U.S., like many countries, is waiting for a surge of hospitalizations, and there are real fears that the health-care system will not have the capacity — or even the beds — to deal with this escalating public-health crisis. This mask is something you can control, and now you are being told not to wear it. It may be a red herring.

There are many other things you cando that are within your control: Wear latex gloves and, if possible, maintain a six-feet-or-more distance from coworkers and customers. Talk to your coworkers about approaching your manager (or the company HQ) to stagger the number of customers in the store at any one time. I have seen everyone from Duane Reade

WBA, -4.39%

 to Trader Joe’s do this.

Dispatches from the front lines of a pandemic: ‘The lack of an all-island response has also rattled communities on both sides of the Irish border.’ Pubs close due to coronavirus, government issues new strict rules for funerals

Another theory why this issue may be the source of so much anxiety for you: You would like your manager to show some appreciation for the customer-facing staff who are working the floor. That includes you. I get it. A “thank you” and an acknowledgment of how you are arguably putting yourselves at increased risk of catching COVID-19 would go a long way.

So let me do what he did not do. Thank you for being there so people can get their groceries and stay home for as long as possible to help prevent catching or spreading this disease. Thank you for doing a job that requires more risks than many. It is appreciated. Hospital and ambulance workers are on the front lines of this crisis and, although this may not help you, they do have it worse.

Continue to take all the necessary precautions, and stay healthy. We are all in this together. Millions of workers are likely to lose their jobs in the coming months, particularly in the hospitality and airline industries. This pandemic will have ramifications that will be written about in history and economic books. People like you who turn up for work every day are helping to make America a safer place.

Your boss is probably under a lot of stress from his boss too. It is his job to ensure the company’s official policy. I doubt he wants anyone to get sick, including himself. In the meantime, thank you.

Coronavirus update for readers:

As of Sunday evening, there were 304,544 confirmed cases and 12,974 deaths worldwide, according to data from the database of Johns Hopkins University’s Center for Systems Science and Engineering; the database also reported 91,540 recoveries. The U.S. has had at least 25,493 confirmed coronavirus cases and 307 deaths, John Hopkins added.

Want to read more? Follow Quentin Fottrell on Twitter and read more of his columns here

Do you have questions about how the coronavirus is impacting your life and finances? Send them to MarketWatch’s Moneyist and please include the state where you live (no full names will be used).

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